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Your Skin Is Your Canvas…

The sun is shining, the temperature is rising and it’s time to switch up your skincare regime for a new season. We all have a tendency to lose track of the fact that our skin is an organ that requires a lot of care and in some instances, it too needs a good detox!

In addition to good nutrition and exercise, you can’t escape the fact that it’s also necessary to adopt a skincare regime that is tailored to your own skin type. You also need to account for any skincare sensitivities or issues that are unique to your own biology. In other words, if you’ve got finicky skin, you need to find those products that work best for your particular skin type.

Experience has shown me that the fewer ingredients present in your skincare products, the better off your skin will be in the long run. Avoid products with a ridiculously long list of ingredients as well as chemicals (i.e. talc, hydroquinone, butyl paraben, propyl paraben, etc) which can have long-term damaging effects on your body systems.

While most if not all of those listed above have been banned in Europe, the U.S. has been slow to make significant progress towards protecting consumers from potentially harmful (i.e. carcinogens, immune system disruptors, etc) chemicals lurking in our skincare products.

I always advocate knowing what’s in your food as well as what’s in your skincare products. Why? YOUR SKIN is an organ and what you put on its surface eventually makes its way into other areas of your body (i.e. other organs, etc). REMEMBER: Your skin has pores and it’s permeable, in other words, don’t put toxic crap on your skin because it will be transported to your blood stream, etc.

So to recap; it’s not enough to exercise, eat healthy nutrient-dense foods, and incorporate mindfulness into your daily activities. You also need to ensure that you minimize your exposure to toxic and harmful chemicals in your environment. The best place to start is with your food and personal care items and work your way outwards in terms of laundry detergents, household cleaning products, etc.

If you’re not sure how or where to get started you can grab a FREE copy of my Pantry Detox Guide right HERE and start with what’s in your kitchen pantry and refrigerator!

My passion and commitment to women’s health and fitness is personal and built on my own experiences and training in healthcare, my personal journey as well as a personal tragedy! I don’t take this fight lightly because it truly is a matter of life or death; knowledge is power!

Take the journey with me to fitness, balance, and empowerment when you book your FREE 30 min clarity session with me right HERE:

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Are You Thirsty When You’re Hungry?

Who hasn’t gone through a time (especially in the summer months), when they were constantly hungry but never seemed to get satiated even after eating a full meal, snacks, etc. I can remember summers where I ate like a horse (had some sips of water throughout the day too!) and it felt like I couldn’t get full! Don’t even get me started on the consequences, a.k.a. “mystery pounds” that just seemed to show up on my stomach, thighs, and butt!

Needless to say, those were some less than happy summers, especially when you factor in me wanting to make sure I had my cuteness factor dialed up to ten, hahaha!

Fast forward to the present and bam! Mystery solved! It’s actually true! In simple terms, your brain can misinterpret thirst for hunger. But first, let’s get a clear definition of both thirst and hunger. In his article entitled “Hunger and Thirst: Issues in the measurement of predictions of eating and drinking”, Richard Dr. Mattes gives the following: “It is first necessary to provide operational definitions of hunger and thirst. Hunger describes those sensations that promote the attainment of minimal energy needs while thirst represents sensations that promote the attainment of minimal hydration needs. ” He also goes on to mention that making the distinction between the two is one that is often made more complex due to a number of factors that feed into the “sensation” of hunger and thirst, namely, individual variability, social behaviors, and physiological attributes, symptoms, etc.

Let’s not even add to that, the constant barrage of media campaigns designed to feed (no pun intedended) and tap into our feelings of nostalgia, comfort and insecurities. These “emotional” wells have  psychological impacts are exploited by marketing campaigns for the sole purpose nudging the public into making particular food choices that are, in most instances, very poor nutritional options.

Unfortunately for a significant segment of society, one of the main consequences of this is the neat epidemic level of diabetes, heart disease and other diet related illnesses. Who would have thought that something as simple as making the distinction between thirst and hunger, could have such potentially, far reaching consequences?

I’m not saying that the, ability to make the distinction between hunger and thirst is the primary root cause or a strong enough association, with the occurences of diabetes and other diet related diseases and illnesses,  but it does give one food for thought.

My take away from all of this? Before you fill your plate, why not try a glass or two of water and give your brain some time to catch up with your stomach?! The bottom line is that distracted eating is problematic and so is allowing your daily routine to become so busy and out of balance,  that something so basic as nutrition and health become the losers in this equation.

Fast food masquerading as “quick” healthy alternatives to mindfully  (a.k.a. foods that have no foreign additves, preservatives, etc) prepped are not beneficial to anyone in the long run. 

Also, rushing through meals, not properly hydrating the body with water (rather than sodas, and drinks or beverages marketed as good substitutes for clean water), and choosing convenience over substance leads down a path that does not end well. Which brings me back to this whole issue of making the distinction between thirst and hunger; “mindless” or “distracted” eating can translate into, consuming more calories than what the body needs, snacking on empty calorie laden foods, and so forth.

Ultimately, balance is the center of it all. Good health is part and parcel of a healthy lifestyle in which self care  (i.e. fitness,  exercise, stress management,  meditation,  mindfully eating, etc ) is viewed as a necessity rather than optional.

If you’re still feeling clues after all of “this” find out more in my holistic fitness and support tribe right here and thank me later! >>FitTribe.Holistic.Fitness.Health<<

Sources:

Mattes, Richard D. “Hunger and Thirst: Issues in measurement and prediction of eating and drinking.” Physiology & Behavior 100.1 (2010):22-32. Print
McKiernan F, Hollis JH, McCabe GP, Mattes RD. Thirst-drinking, hunger-eating; tight coupling? J AM Diet Assoc. 2009;109:486-90

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The Good, Bad, And The Ugly!

The “Ides Of March” (my little Shakespeare reference,  hahaha) are not far off and before you know it, we’ll all be agonizing over those extra rolls we picked up over the winter months. Needless to say, that’s not all we picked up; less healthy eating, more of eating for comfort vs. eating for hunger, more sedentary vs. active, and the list goes on.

So let’s not beat ourselves up over that stuff, rather, let’s focus on solutions that lead to results that can actually be sustained and maintained over time! When I first started the healthy lifestyle journey,  I remember being so TIRED of being sick and tired and because of that; hitting my version of “rock bottom” to the point where there was literally no way that I would stay on that hamster wheel!

I like to start a new season by detoxing my fridge so that I have the right “food” to go with a right “mindset” and that, equals success! Making the right nutritional choices for your health, are not that difficult to come up with nor are they unachievable. You simply have to change your mindset about what it means to be healthy and whether or not you value yourself enough to change your lifestyle.

Now some might say, “that’s easy for you to say”, and my response is, the following: guaranteed sickness, disease, and regret do not constitute an acceptable alternative. If you want to be fit, healthy and have a well-balanced lifestyle, you have to just do it and make the commitment or else you will never have the energy or drive to pursue those things that make life meaningful-simple!

We’re at a time in the year where it’s time to start digging through our pantries and closets and get into the business of throwing out those things we no longer need or want (a.k.a. detox). I’m a firm believer in keeping things simple and to the point. Case in point, any packaged food that lists ingredients I can’t pronounce (i.e. additives) or have been reduced to acronyms, I throw them out (or avoid buying them in the first place).

I just see that as code for stuff that’s either been banned in Europe for its associated health risks or based on my own personal research about certain ingredients in our food system that are suspect (i.e. no nutritional value or just haven’t been pulled by the Food and Drug Administration).

In the meantime, get educated about where your food comes from, get in the FitTribe Zone and get moving!

Also, here’s your FREE copy of my Pantry Detox guide and remember, “you are what you eat!”

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Are YOU ALWAYS Available?!

Do you catch yourself always making or being available for everything and anyone? Stop that! It’s time for some self-care; time to STOP putting your needs aside and face up to the fact that you need to build some fences…
Being selfless, helpful and nurturing is definitely noteworthy but, there comes a time when you need to set conditions and limit access to your time and sacred space. I’m all for “doing” but when or, at what point do you replenish and renew yourself  (i.e. self-care, tend to your own needs, etc) or even ask for some assistance for yourself or for a personal task?

That’s not being unselfish or “giving”, that’s what I call INSECURE;  unable to separate your own worth or value from your ability to “help” or be “available.”  More specifically, coupling your identity and self-worth to your ability to “help”/ or be needed by someone else.

In other words, if you find yourself constantly stuck in a cycle (a.k.a. hamster wheel going nowhere) of continuous tasks, obligations,  or activities for other people  (and finding it difficult to say no), you’ve got a problem and not the other way around. There was a time when I too found it not only difficult to say no but also found it hard to set boundaries for other people and things.

Setting and being able to set boundaries also speaks to the issue of balance. It’s also an aspect of personal development in terms of what and who you allow into your sacred space (a.k.a your home, environment or personal space, etc). For instance, not knowing when to say no to a request or anything that not alignment with your wants, comfort level, etc is a flashing red light that says   “more inside” work required!

In other words, you shouldn’t feel pressed into agreeing with a position if it goes against the core of your being; there’s absolutely nothing wrong with refusing to engage or feel obligated to do something that you know will take you out of alignment with your core beliefs or feels invasive. To me, that’s not a growth driven discomfort but rather smacks of someone trying to get in your Koolaid without knowing your flavor!

Looking back, I’ve seen soo many instances where I did not set the appropriate boundaries (because of my own personal development deficits) and I wound up on the losing end of things. I’ve since discovered I’m not alone in this experience and for women, this seems to be one our weak points; not knowing your own value and failing to appreciate your unique authentic self.

There’s always that one client who asks “what does that have to do with getting fit?” A lot actually!

My question to you today is, ARE YOU READY TO DO WHAT’S NECESSARY, OR STAY ON THE HAMSTER WHEEL GOING NOWHERE?!

CLICK BELOW TO JOIN ME AND OTHERS ON THE SAME JOURNEY AS YOU.

JOIN FIT TRIBE HOLISTIC FITNESS HEALTH NOW

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To Vegan or Not?

Every day there seems to be some new toxin that we’re being exposed to in the environment; an environment that our current government seems eager to pollute even more by relaxing regulations on the fossil fuel industry, big Agra-business, etc. So what’s the alternative? Do you trust regulatory agencies to do their due diligence for you, the consumer in terms of ensuring that our food sources are secure, safe to consume, and toxin free? Or, do you become your own advocate and educate yourself about where you food choices as well as put your money where your health is?

There are a lot of factors to consider when it comes to making choices about what “foods” we will allow in to our bodies and in the bodies of our loved ones. Key among them is, “is it safe to eat?”, “is it healthy?”, and the real kicker; “can I afford it?” Now I am sure you’re asking, “what does going vegan have to do with it?” For me, going vegan is simply a spectrum of food and nutritional choices based on one’s own personal decisions and calculations predicated on the issues I mentioned earlier. Given the current state of affairs both nationally and globally (i.e. obesity, climate and environmental crisis) we owe it to ourselves, families and communities, to be proactive about our health and that of the world we live in. We no longer have the luxury of blindly buying foods based on marketing gimmicks and misinformation!

From a healthcare standpoint alone, diets high in fruits, veggies, nuts, (i.e. Mediterranean diet, etc) or largely plant-based, are associated with significantly reduced occurences of chronic disease, obesity, cancer, and so forth. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that you need to shift your diets (nutritional  sources) away from processed  and packaged stuff that masquerades as food.

Will it take work? Yes, but no more than usual (if you prep your meals ahead of time,  plan your meals for the week while you watch tv, etc) and your wallet will thank you! In the end, consuming less animal products will save you a lot of money as well as lower your chances of having to pay a visit to the both the cardiologist and oncologist sometime in the future.

I’ll let you ruminate on that info for a bit and in the meantime, ask yourself what’s holding you back from taking the right steps to bring your fitness and life in balance. Better yet, if you really want to gain back your power and get off that hamster wheel going nowhere, book a clarity call below and get up and GO!

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Food? Waist? Why The Obsession?

wp-1484039503567.jpgWhy are we so obsessed with food and our waistlines? This question and more, constantly leave me with a bevy of theories or reasons why there is such a large number of women in the U.S. and the west in general  (and to a smaller degree, other parts of the world), who seem fixated on both food and their waistlines. Why the constant battle with our food? As a fitness and health strategist with a background in biological anthropology, I can’t help but wonder if something more complex, and culturally relevant is at play in this insanity, and dare I say, misconceptions based on misinformation.

This problem stems in large part, from a grossly uneducated and misinformed public with  regard to what constitutes basic “good” nutrition and the plethora of misinformation peddled by a large segment of the media, as well as the fast and processed food industries. Additionally, our food policies and regulatory agencies (i.e. FDA, USDA, etc) have failed to show leadership in this area. Let us get real with ourselves, our food choices are also (and in some instances, largely) driven by factors other than basic hunger (i.e. “I hunger, therefore I eat”).

The point here is that, individual’ taste’s, culture, habits, and environment etc, play a pivotal role in our food choices, and by extension, the current food-related epidemic (obesity, heart disease, etc) we are facing at both the local and national level. First, let’s revisit the basics of why we need to eat at all. We need to eat and drink (water, at the most fundamental) to live; food equals fuel for the daily life-sustaining functions of the body at the chemical, cellular, and systemic levels.

After that, there is no physical reason (technically speaking) why we need to eat other than to sustain life. What I’m driving at here is that, outside of eating to keep the body operating at an optimum level ( regardless of age, for instance) there is no real reason to eat anything beyond what is necessary for maintaining a “healthy body”. So why do we do what we do? Why are we so unhealthy in terms of what we eat and how that translates into our current health issues? While I don’t claim to hold all the answers to what will arguably, require complex solutions (I’ll leave that in the capable hands of academic researchers), I do believe that an informed public is one that is healthy and empowered.

Case in point, big agribusiness and the packaged food industry argue that it is “expensive” and “unsustainable” to buy local and organic food items; that there is no “real” difference (in terms of nutritional content or quality) between organic produce and conventionally grown produce. Additionally, they often point to “research” that supports their claims. However, there is an increasing body of unbiased research that not only counters these claims but also exposes a number of the myths about the benefits of consuming organic produce vs. conventionally grown produce, food additives (i.e. dyes in processed foods, etc) and so forth.

As an avid food lover and someone who wants to know what’s in my food, the fact remains that it is in my best interest (as well as the interest of my family, community and environment) that I educate myself and others about the food production system. Why? Food is life and we live in an age where unsustainable and unhealthy industrial as well as food production systems have taken a toll on both our health and environment. Furthermore, if we expect to have a habitable planet in the future, we need to demand much more of ourselves and the industries we choose to engage in. So what does that all mean? In simple terms, it is impossible to make the necessary changes for better human and environmental health, if we are ignorant of both the processes and or mechanisms that negatively affect us.

With regards to the waistline fixation? I believe it is a distraction away from the real issues surrounding our health; a symptom of a problem that is more complex than we as individuals (especially women) or a nation, are willing to address. Our health system ranks at the bottom amongst industrialized nations, in addition to the fact that  segments of government that are responsible for ensuring public health, safety, and our food production systems, are grossly underfunded (and remain under attack from industry-backed legislators, etc). Unfortunately that’s not where the problem ends.  Misinformation and miseducation is wide-spread in mainstream media with “infotainment” rather than “information” being served to the public on a daily basis.

If for no other reason than protecting our very lives and the lives of our loved ones, community and environment, “we” must become educated and active when it comes to our health and wellness. A crash diet, shopping at Whole Foods, etc, is not going to get the job done, nor will fixating on someone else’s perceptions of beauty help women and girls develop a healthy self-image.

I’ve literally lost count of the number of fitness gadgets, weight-loss shakes, and other helpful whatcha-ma-call-its,  circulating on the market. Most of these gadgets  are far more successful at parting you from your money, than providing you with any real long-term success. While the public has a role to play (self-advocacy, personal research, etc)  regarding its health care, the current dynamics and recycling of misinformation does not favor the general public. There is light at the end of the tunnel, but we must be willing and committed to engaging in our food production systems (i.e. getting educated about where our food comes from, what’s in it, or what’s been added to it, etc) as well as playing an active role in changing the policies that shape both our healthcare and food production systems.

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Nuts not fluff: Incorporating Nuts and Seeds As Part of a Healthy Diet

my-first-design-1People often ask me why I’m so obsessed about seeds and nuts and I could rattle off a whole slew of information (see sources below) about why they’re so great. After watching their eyes invariably glaze over from information overload, I’ve since discovered that less is more, and simplicity is a gem worth appreciating. The simple answer lays in the fact that we (meaning homo Sapiens) are at our optimal health and fitness when we adhere to a diet that is both diverse and nutritionally dense. This is in both the historic and evolutionary record ( I won’t bore you with the details) as well as the current health crisis many in the industrialized (as well as underdeveloped nations) are facing in terms of ever-increasing numbers of diabetes, cancer, as well as autoimmune diseases.

It is no small coincidence that our propensity for, and our over indulgence in so-called “quick” and “processed” foods have a strong connection or link to the incidence of the above mentioned diseases and associated syndromes. The bottom line, is that processed foods, our dependency on them, coupled with a lack of adequate exercise (daily), has brought us to the brink of a near pandemic. Add to that unsustainable environmental and agricultural practices, and a grime picture begins to unfold for the human race; but a solution for one problem at a time please.

In simple terms, nuts can be defined as “small dry hard-shelled dry fruit or seed with a separable rind or shell an interior kernel” (Merriam-Webster Dictionary definition). A much more detailed definition is provided by the National Institutes of Health (see National Institutes of Health website) which states that nuts are “nutrient dense foods with complex matrices rich in unsaturated fatty and other bioactive compounds: high-quality vegetable protein, fiber, minerals, tocopherols, phytosterols, and phenolic compounds.” Translation? nuts constitute a dense powerhouse store of complete nutrients (i.e. fats, fibre, carbohydrates, etc).

All that being said, there is such a thing as too much of a good thing. While nuts are nutrient dense, they do contain fat and that means you must balance their intake with other sources of vital nutrients that contain fewer calories as well as fats. The key take away here is “BALANCE”; in terms of nutritional intake (i.e. amount per serving, etc) as well as lin proportion to other nutrient sources. For instance, a balanced intake of nuts (and or seeds, i.e. sunflower walnuts) at one sitting relative to other nutrient sources, would be equivalent to 1/3/ cup or 1 and 1/2 oz of nuts 3-4 servings per week for a 1,600 calorie diet and 4-5 servings per week for a 2,000 calorie diet (American Heart Association: 2013 Healthy Diet recommendations;Eckel, Robert H. et al. “2013 AHA/ACC).

While similar to seeds in terms of nutrient content, seeds are, in simple terms, the embryonic stage of a plant housed in a protective outer shell or hull. The dietary guidelines for seeds are similar to those for nuts, but the caveat remains the same; balance, balance, balance, is the mantra we should all stick to when it comes to nutrition, health (mind-body) and fitness. Why am I pushing them? I’m a firm believer in balance and the pivotal role it plays in our health and fitness within the context of a healthy and free lifestyle. My own personal experience alone has driven home the inherent power of a well-balanced and nutrient dense diet; not only that, from a physical fitness perspective, a poor diet will doom you to failure and injury (i.e. failing to fuel your body the nutrients required for both recovery and muscle growth).

From a female perspective, I’ve come to learn the importance of incorporating dietary balance into my daily regime as a means of negating undesirable effects of changes in hormonal levels, stress, and illness recovery. While nutrition and fitness alone can not wholly stave off the negative impacts of illness, disease, time, and so forth, they are powerful resources in our arsenal that are available to help us achieve optimum fitness, health, and the freedom to pursue our goals and passions.

Remember, getting fit and healthy requires that you first make the decision, develop a plan, and take action. For more information as well as assistance regarding how to get started on your journey, join the FitTribe of fellow women who are getting stronger everyday!

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References

Eckel, Robert H. et al. “2013 AHA/ACC Guideline on Lifestyle Management to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk.” Circulation, vol. 129, no. 25 suppl 2, Dec. 2013, doi:10.1161/01.cir.0000437740.48606.d1.

Ros, Emilio. “Health Benefits of Nut Consumption.” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmc3257681/.